Unlike Any Store You've Ever Seen
Free Shipping on Thousands of Products
Award-Winning Customer Service

High Definition Television

Screen Resolution is a way of explaining how crisp the picture looks. Usually, the resolution is described in numbers and letters. 1080p, 720p, and 1080i are the numbers that are associated with High Definition TV (HDTV). The numbers stand for the lines of pixels in the screen. The total number of pixels is measured by multiplying the lines of pixels (horizontal and vertical). For instance, when a TV is 1080p, it is actually 1920 (horizontal lines of pixels) X 1080 (vertical lines of pixels) =  2,073,600 total pixels.

The letters associated with the numbers “P” and “I” stand for progressive and interlaced. Comparing screens with the same resolutions, progressive has double the picture information than the interlaced with a more fluid and stable image. Is there a noticeable difference between 1080p and 720p? Yes, especially when watching HD and Blu-ray DVDs. The 720p image will look as if it is lacking the same quality that the 1080p has.

 Glossary

16:9 and 4:3, also known as Aspect Ratio: An aspect ratio of an image is the ratio of an image’s width by its height. 16:9 is the universal standard for High-Definition TVs and 4:3 is the universal standard for standard definition TVs.

Bitrate: is measured in "bits per second." It is used to express the rate at which data is transmitted or processed. A higher bitrate equals more data processed per second as well as a higher picture resolution. Digital video formats typically have bitrates measured in megabits-per-second (Mbps). One megabit equals one million bits.

Component Video: Between S-Video, Composite, and Component—Component is the best signal you can send to your TV from your VCR or DVD player. The component signals are separated into color and brightness. The color and brightness signals are separated into two separate signals each. This gives a better, clearer signal, eliminates color bleeding, and improves color precision.

De-interlacing or called line-doubling: is the process of converting an interlaced-scan video signal (where each frame is split into two sequential fields) to a progressive-scan signal (where each frame remains whole).

De-interlaces are found in digital TVs and progressive-scan DVD players. More advanced de-interlaces include a feature called 3-2 pull down processing, which is the process of converting video based movies to progressive scan. The fluidity becomes uninterrupted when extra frames are created and two original frames are combined.

Digital audio output:
is a connection found on HDTVs and HDTV tuners. It sends the Dolby Digital audio signals of HDTV broadcasts to an A/V receiver for Dolby Digital decoding. The two most common types of digital output are coaxial and Tos-link optical.

Dolby Digital: This surround sound technology gives the listener undeniable music quality from any source. Dolby can produce anything from 1-5.1 channels of surround. (Dolby Digital Plus offers up to 7.1 channels of surround)  If the DVD player that you are purchasing does not include a Dolby decoder, then you will have to connect it with a receiver. Dolby Digital has been the standard for surround sound for many years.

Digital Light Projection (DLP) TV: Also known as a rear projection TV.

DTV (Digital Television): Is the digital TV broadcast standard.

DVI (Digital Visual Interface): Is a multi-pin computer-style connection intended to carry a High-Definition video signal from a digital set-top box (HDTV-capable DIRECTV, DISH Network, and cable boxes) to a HDTV monitor with via compatible connector. Signals are encrypted with High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) to prevent recording.

High Definition Television: Screen Resolution is a way of explaining how crisp the picture looks. Usually, the resolution is described in numbers and letters. 1080p, 720p, and 1080i are the numbers that are associated with High Definition TV (HDTV). The numbers stand for the lines of pixels in the screen. The total number of pixels is measured by multiplying the lines of pixels (horizontal and vertical). For instance, when a TV is 1080p, it is actually 1920 (horizontal lines of pixels) X 1080 (vertical lines of pixels) = 2,073,600 total pixels.

HDTV-ready: Is the term used to describe a TV capable of displaying a digital High-Definition TV format when it’s connected to a HDTV tuner. They generally have built-in tuners for receiving regular NTSC broadcasts, but not digital. An HDTV-ready TV may also be referred to as an "HDTV monitor."

Luminance: Determines picture detail. It is the contrast between black and white and the brightness of the picture.

MHz (Megahertz): Is used to measure cycles per second. A Megahertz (MHz) is one million cycles per second, the higher the MHz, the higher the refresh rate. LCD and LED TVs range from 60Hz, 120Hz, and 240Hz and Plasma TVs range from 480Hz to 600Hz.
MPEG (Moving Picture Experts Group): Is the group in charge of regulating motion picture audio and video standards. Day-to-day, the terms that consumers will run into most are MPEG-2 and MPEG-4. They produce high quality video by using a unique bitrate process that allocates more bits for scenes that include a lot of motion and reduces the bits in low-action scenes.

MPEG-2: This compression agent is used for TV broadcasts, standard definition DVDs, some Blu-ray and HD discs, and small satellite dish broadcasts.

MPEG-4: This compression agent is newer and more proficient than MPEG-2. It is used with Blu-ray discs, HD DVDs, and newer satellite dish broadcasts.

Progressive and Interlaced: The letters associated with the numbers “P” and “I” stand for progressive and interlaced. Comparing screens with the same resolutions, progressive has double the picture information than the interlaced with a more fluid and stable image. Is there a noticeable difference between 1080p and 720p? Yes, especially when watching HD and Blu-ray DVDs. The 720p image will look as if it is lacking the same quality that the 1080p has.

Set Top Box: Also known as Digital Converter Box.

S-Video: This cable carries the color and brightness parts of a video signal.

 

Revised 05/06/2010


Watch Abt's How to Buy an HDTV Buying Guide

HDTV Categories:

HDTV Receiver
HDTV Receivers



HDTV Siganl
HDTV Signals

HDTV Televisions:

Plasma TVs
Plasma TVs



LCD TVs
LCD TVs



DLP TVs
DLP TVs



LCD Projection TVs
LCD Projection TVs



all TVs